Text

Aunty announced her arrival the night before, bringing a smile to my peaceful face.
The tiredness had set in by then after such a long day, but he had made it all OK. Such is his way.

What good fortune! An Aunt with open arms and quiet ways.
Provides a space to clear my mind and body.

A friend so precious and true; teaching, healing and cheering.
What luck!

And the child.
Her mother knew she was a soul who would shake us and named her accordingly.
Quiet, but forthright, she is a sweet lady, bird of joy.
Feeling lonely again, she clearly states her will, and duty bound, it is made so!
She cuddles teddy with such a tender grip, I feel one of my scales fall away. They are falling everyday.

Soft and sincere, I am thankful for the gift of her, here.
Her Uncle brings his form of discipline, persevering on that winding path.
We women, little precious included, are not easily turned. Ha.

But sense prevails.

Her head is wrapped. We sing of twinkling stars, gospel blessings, bus wheels.
She is soothed by the soft candlelight and the firm order. Sleep!
Soft and stern is a combination destined to benefit the youth not already lost.
Peace reigns where angels sleep.

SB

Quote

"Even the Golden Rule of business has transformed. The old Golden Rule in business was to find out what your customers wanted, and give it to them. Today, if you ask your customers what they want and you give it to them, you’re missing a huge opportunity, because their answers will never give you more than a fraction of your potential."

Source: futuristgerd
Text

birchbox:

image

In the summer of 1853, a hot tempered chef was manning the kitchen at a chic resort. A dinner guest found the chef’s French fries too thick for his liking and sent the plate back to the kitchen. In an effort to one up the persnickety customer, the chef sliced the potatoes paper-thin. And eureka! America’s favorite salty, snack—duh! the potato chip—was born. 

Unexpected discovery of a seriously great thing, right? Like our favorite crunchy fix, these four beauty products have surprising (and totally awesome!) beginnings. 

Read More

Source: birchbox
Photo Set

tbridge:

thefrogman:

The Nature of Ambition by Grant Snider [website | tumblr | twitter]

This is really close to home today.

Do it with love and you will prevail, in your own way

(via goodideaexchange)

Source: theamericankid
Photo Set

eclecticsoul1975:

#waistbeads #afrocentric #handmade

The growing popularity of waist beads as a trend in the West has led them to take on their own meanings and interpretations. Now, many women wear them as a form of personal expression or as a fashion statement. Although waist beads are not limited to any race, culture, or country, it is still very important to know and understand the significance of waist beads within African cultures.

Waist beads have a long history in Africa dating back to ancient Egypt and are worn for various reasons and purposes. They are a symbol and celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, first menses, protection, seduction, and wealth amongst other things. The meaning of the colors and different shapes of beads varies with every tribe and they can be thought of as a visual dialect. Each bead, color, and shape relays a different message depending on the receiver.

Traditionally, mothers adorned their daughters with waist beads during their first menstruation as a rite of passage into womanhood. The beads symbolized a young lady’s fertility, developing body, and her sexuality. A young lady’s beads were adorned with bells to let possible suitors know that she was at the proper stage for sexual intercourse. In many cultures the waist beads symbolized a young woman’s purity and were to only be taken off by her husband on their wedding night.

Waist beads can also be worn for seduction. For some, the beads posses intimate appeal and can provoke desire. Yoruban women are said to have laced their beads with charms and fragrances that were known to be irresistible to the opposite sex. Some women wore different shapes of beads and only wore them during intimacy as a means of enhancing the sexual experience of her and her husband. The beads to some women are what lingerie is to modern women. Wives would often lure their husbands with the rattle of the beads or use them as a means to communicate their fertility at certain times of the month.

Many women have also used waist beads as an instrument of body shaping. The beads were used to alert women of their weight gain or if they were pregnant. Unlike clothing, the beads do not stretch; they break or roll up the waist so as mentioned before, instead of using scales as a means of weight measurement, the beads were used for women to monitor their weight. If your beads were higher on your body or popped, it meant that you were gaining weight and if your beads lowered on your waist, it was a sign that you were losing weight.

There is so much beauty and history behind waist beads. They are more than mere shapes, colors and sizes. Each string of beads holds traditions, values, and customs. It’s fine to use these beads as a form of expression or as a fashion statement but please do not forget the history.

-Bilphena Yahwon

source: http://africaisdonesuffering.com/2013/02/waist-beads/

Source: eclecticsoul1975
Text

The new moon is consuming 

leaving our entirety less than it need be.

Baby, it can’t happen for reasons you will not see.

I can no longer show you.

Dead ends become me.

At times I am immersed, swimming my sea of tears

Your wounds stubborn in their healing.

The shoreline is vast but my feet will not align to climb.

You open, then orchestrate each scene.

Reveling in creating danger we have misplaced.

Unforeseen.

Leave it alone for it seems you do not absorb pain.

 

Tell yourself that your soul is running free.

You do not think this way for me.

Our truth and heart is clouded in refusal;

Candid abuse and shrouded proposals.

The facade subdues my intuition, renders my spirit infantile.

Summoning cries and sighs as would a toddler losing the teat.

You glimmer with violence, venom and art.

Calculation masquerading as protection. 

Scraping your veneer I glimpse a longing

for something you know not how to maintain.

What would you rather gain?

Channel resources to escape your mindset

Distractions become demands enveloping your sense.

But your eyes have to see

what all this has achieved.

© Sia Bockarie

Text

He may feel that his role is explicit

and somewhat illicit

But from his breed of hard knocks he has deduced 

that to sanely survive

He must strive for,

in pursuit of the riches his heart feels he deserves.

The barrier remains unopened on my part;

it has no place residing in that heart.

Casual, yet smart,

He manipulates carefully

to keep his colours untainted.

His wide spectrum, the rainbow within, 

owns a pot with sprinklings of amber.

With foresight,

for what he wants the future to bring.

The past, reflective, has bred the air of calculated

control

determination

intrigue

Alluding to distrust

and despair.

Who is not there?

© Sia Bockarie

Link

DC Women Kicking Ass: Happy Father's Day to the Dads of DC Comics!

dcwomenkickingass:

Today is Father’s Day so if you have a dad or someone you think of as a dad and they love you and you love them, I hope you have a good day. To celebrate I am once again offering my apologies to Dr. Seuss and offering a poem for the day.

(ahem)

There are dads who stealthy

image
And dads…
Source: dcwomenkickingass
Photo

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Something’s wrong with this picture. Racism still exists in America. Deny it all you want, it’s still here!

And the beat goes on

(via theblackdrips-gold)

Source: thepoliticalfreakshow
Quote

"It seems to me that on one page I recognized a portion of an old diary of mine which mysteriously disappeared shortly after my marriage, and, also, scraps of letters which, though considerably edited, sound to me vaguely familiar. In fact, Mr. Fitzgerald (I believe that is how he spells his name) seems to believe that plagiarism begins at home."

-

—Zelda Fitzgerald, in a review of her husband’s book in 1922 (via trishahaddad)

Reminder that F. Scott Fitzgerald stole his wife’s writing, many times, while suppressing her works. See “Save Me the Waltz”, which he forced her to revise so that he could use parts of it in his own book “Tender Is the Night”. And which author do we study in school?

(via rubyvroom)

I didn’t know this.

(via alienswithankhs)


He also encouraged her to have affairs so he could use that for inspiration, and when she wanted to leave him for a man she fell in love with, he locked her in their house and wouldn’t let her leave.

When she wanted to publish “Save me the Waltz,” Fitzgerald wrote in his diary about DELIBERATELY trying to TRIGGER her schizophrenic episodes and making her incapable of fighting that battle.

And Fitzgerald scholars KNOW all this.  They write articles about how it was all okay because in the end, it inspired Fitzgerald to write Great Literature.

(via prozacpark)

knife his corpse

(via freedominwickedness)


that sounds about right

(via missleaves)

He was a shitty author, tho…

(via heirofmedusa)

She was somewhat too inspiring for the jealous thief!

Shrink and subdue, hide and relent…thank goodness more women are now able to publish their works as their own.

The burden of mental illness becomes the whip they beat you with. If you allow it.

(via theblackdrips-gold)

Source: trishahaddad.com